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of the plan will take money from the depositors. cyprus has an economy the size of vermont but the assets eight times more than the country's gdp. therein the financial woes come as no surprise to analysts. listen to what alan greenspan said friday. >> europe has been hanging over the american markets for quite a while. the removal of that risk, i think temporarily, i think it is only temporary, has enabled the underlying forces of the market to begin to come into vision. >> and today, the clearer vision that greenspan referred to was clouded the cyprus, we have the report by cyprus matters. >> reporter: cyprus is a smaller island with a smaller economy. but now they're watching what happens in the tiny mediterranean nation. >> it's a tiny nation. the reason we care about it is of course cyprus like it was in greece. it's what it means for the bigger nations if they follow and go down the same bath. >> banking is a huge part of cyprus' economy. and it's a mess. if it fails the country will probably fail, too and the european union will not let the country fail. here's the thing, the bigge
the same bath. >> banking is a huge part of cyprus' economy. and it's a mess. if it fails the country will probably fail, too and the european union will not let the country fail. here's the thing, the biggest payers are the russians. >> they don't want to bail out the depositors because they are mainly russians. that's what the issue is. >> so finance makers said depositors are going be compensated. but with the stock market down some 60 percent those chairs are essentially wortless. >> the blanks are closed and won't open until votes on the bailout measure. people are waiting in lines at atms to withdraw money from their accounts and countries are worried around the world that citizens would take money out of their banks that's why even the most seasoned wall street veterans watching what happens in the tiny island in the mediterranean. for "nightly business report" i'm sue herrera. >> so what does it mean to american investors? we turn to the ceo of pimco the world's largest bond fund. i asked if the situation in cypress is unique or is it a serious issue for the u.s.? >> it is mai
and the growth of the economy, we're still some distance from the high. it is not all that surprising the stock market would rise given that has been increased optimism about the economy and the share of income going to profits has been very high. relationship between stock prices and earnings is not particularly unusual at this point. >> the associated press. mr. chairman, statement mentions fiscal policy has become more restrictive. how much of a drag do you see from the social security tax increase and the across-the-board spending cuts that went into effect on march 1 and is it possible the fed might see a need to provide more support to the economy because of that drag on the fiscal? >> our analysis is fairly comparable to analysis congressional budget office presented to the congress and thestimate put together the fisl measures including the fiscal cliff deal, they sequester and other cuts that federal fiscal restraint in 2013 is cutting something like 1.5 percentage points off of growth to which is very significant. so that is an issue for us. we take as given with the fiscal authoritie
-run, healthy economy. that does have some effect on monetary policy. one of the most powerful tools we have is bringing down mortgage rates and stimulating home buying, construction, and related industries. so that is an issue we take into account. i would say one thing, which is that as the housing industry has strengthened and home prices have gone up, that has actually brought some people into the credit box, in the sense that the number of people, for example, who are underwater on their mortgages, is declining, as house prices go up. so as people have bigger down payments, bigger equity in their homes, they become more creditworthy. so to some extent, not -- i don't want to overstate it, but to some extent, monetary policy, by strengthening the housing market, helping support house prices, is bringing more people into the mortgage market. >> fox business. the stock market has been hitting all-time highs. it's recovered all of its losses from the financial crisis. i just want to know from you if i still have time to get in. but, seriously, how do you feel about that? is it good? is it b
to be fiscally responsible and reduce the deficit. to make velft to grow our economy and to meet our obligation to our seniors, to our families and to our future and the republican budget fails all three. republican budget threatens our nation by undermining our economic growth and by shifting the financial burden for the deficit, and the deficit reduction, to our seniors and the middle class. republicans have made their choices clear, end medicare as we know it, adding costs to seniors today and ending the medicare guarantee tomorrow, slashing investments necessary for economic competitiveness and giving millionaires an average of $400,000 in tax breaks. republican budget eliminates protection for millions of our sickest seniors who depend on nursing home and home health services and republican budget will increase taxes for average middle-class families by $3,000. their choices will cost two million jobs next year alone and decrease economic growth by 1.7%. in contrast, the democratic alternative present serves -- preserves the medicare guarantee and makes investments in education, innovation
to the economy. the economy needs financial assistance from the outside from the european union and i'm afraid the people running the show presumably the germans in the first instance have decided greek depositors should take a hit. the way that played out at least over the weekend was all depositors would take a hit of some kind no matter how small their deposit. it sales to be now an attempt to back away from that and focus on people with deposits over 100,000 euros targeting in part russians who hold a large amounts of money, claims on those cyprian banks. >> rose: when that happened what was the talk in the financial community citing your com a couple quotes one from dennis gotman the binging has been shaken to its roots. the banking depends on trust. he wrote a note to his clients trust that has now been shattered, broken and destroyed. jim o'neal at goldman sachs says astonishing with very little thought of containing. >> bailout 101 is you want to keep the money in the banks. you want to avoid a run on the banks. you want to avoid where people are standing outside wanting their cash be
to jump-start the economy, not just the stock market. let's go to nicole petallides at new york stock exchange. david: let's start, nicole. we start with fedex it was an extraordinary run-up. it was in the $100 range. it pulls back quite a bit. this is the biggest pullback since 2011? >> certainly is, the biggest pull back since 2011. concerns globally and also going to cut down what they're shipping over it asia. lauren: how is oracle looking ahead of their earnings release, nicole? >> we're watching oracle closely in the tax realm. we'll see whether or not they have earnings. [closing bell rings] david: best buy up another 5%. that stock can not be denied. as you her the bells are ringing on wall street. looks like the indexes are going to keep essentially where they were before and after ben bernanke began to talk. looked like they were sliding a bit. they stopped that slide. trading this the 50 to 60-point range on the dow. the s&p is doing better percentagewise. nasdaq is doing well. russell 2000, small and mid-sized caps doing well. there are interesting company stories and sect
laugh. we'll get his prediction where natural gas prices are headed next. >>> not even a down economy can crush rock and roll. legendar kiss rockers gene simmons and paul stanley kick off a big expan shun of their restaurants. they're here in first on fox interview to tell us why now is the time to bet on the consumer. even when they say it's not it is always about money melissa: first let's turn to today's market moment. fears over cyprus's bailout led to a choppy day of trading on wall street. the dow managed to eke out a slight gain wi the nasdaq and s&p 500 posting minor laws. the s&p fell for thehird straight seson. that is the worst losing streak of the year. microsoft could be in some hot water with the justice department. microsoft and some of its business partners are being investigated over a foreign bribery claims. government officials in china, italy and romania were allegedly bribed to earn software contracts but shares of microsoft still managed to close the day up slightly. >>> all right we start tonight in cyprus. th parliament rejected the tax on bank deposits, potent
money into the economy? they let us know the exit plan for all of this. melissa: taxpayer outrage, bankrupt city in california paying out a million dollars in pay raises. they are bankrupt. lori: and paying races? crazy town. fedex says more customers are taking a less expensive option and it is hitting the bottom line. melissa: the cyber threat hit by online hackers putting financial firms here on high alert. but first, time for stocks now. nicole petallides is standing by. stocks posted solid gains ahead of the fed decision. nicole: that is right. everybody focused on the fed about an hour away from now. very accommodated if fed, and we're watching a market hitting new all-time highs in the dow jones industrial. of almost 56 points at the moment showing you some names that hit some highs today including nativ united technolo. hitting the highest levels we've ever seen for those names and we cannot leave out verizon. the highest levels we'v we haven in over 11 years. so while the shareholders have been enjoying great dividends, they can now also note multi-year highs as well. as
, tyler, all about the federal reserve and the economy. >> and cyprus in there for good measure. it was a very busy news day. we're here to tell you all about it. the federal reserve did it again. says it's going to keep ierest rates where they are, near 0%. and it also says it's going to keep up its bond-buying program. the markets like what they heard from the fed along with a pledge from the new head of japan central bank about its own bold, easing measures to be unvailed on thursday. as a result, stocks moved higher here about. the dow touching an all-time intraday high. the blue chips did close 56 higher. nasdaq up by 25 and the s&p 500 se f the rst time in four sessions adding 10 points and taking us to within a few of an all-time high. steve leaseman tells us where we go from here. >> the federal reserve voting 11 to 1 to keep its policy in place and purchasing $85 billion a month in treasury and mortgage-backed securities in an effort to drive down long-term interest rates. but the federal reserve chairman in the press conference after the statement came out, suggested t
on the pulse of the economy and consumers. landry's is one of the country's largest estaurant and gammably companies. he is here to tell us where he sees the biggest headwinds and opportunities right now. >>> call it the anti-student loan. investors will pay school costs for a piece of student's future income. isn't that interesting? can this help solve the student debt crisis? the ceo behind it will explain this break through because even when they say it is a not it is always about money melissa: first today's market moment. the bulls are back in the driver's seat. the fed says its policy to stimulate the economy will continue and investors breathed a sigh of relief. dow came close to setting a new record high. the nasdaq marched back toward a 12-year high. the s&p 500 finished less than seven points away from its all-time high. here is who made the big money, proctor & gamble, chevron, travelers and johnson & johnson and united technologies all closed at all-time highs. congratulationses if you own those stocks. >>> all right. our top story tonight how the government in cyprus is make b
-sixth of the economy in order to be able to gain control of our lives, and of course it's going to be a mess. what does the government do that is good when it starts interfering with our lives? there are functions for the government. they need to remember what those things are and leave the rest of us alone. >> neil: what they discovered, as you warned -- this is prior to your prayer breakfast meet and greet with the president -- that all of a sudden the goodies would be showcased up front. the problems would be later. the goodies were fewer, the problems many more, and the cost of this potentially much, much hire than the thought. how is all of this rolling out now? >> well, of course the reason that it was done in secret, rather than in a transparent manner in which it was supposed to have been done, is because there are so many bad parts of it. there's so many obligations so many new taxes associated with it. it's incredibly expense simple. it was supposed to lower the cost. it has raised the cost of the premiums for average family, and in the neighborhood of $5,000. this is a disaster. and the real
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company with extraordinarily small economy. the fact it would precipitate a run with the greek banks or italian banks and bring down the entire system in europe, fumbling along, kicking the can down the road is really pretty fried and we know from experience these events, whether in the balkins with the shooting of an arch duke or whether in cyprus with the shooting of a banking system can lead to fairly significant consequences for the entire european continent and us. >> so far, the worst-case scenario hasn't happened yet. so far. that's good. let me ask you, steve forbes. do you believe that the united states can make itself immune? are we strong enough economically, and financially, to withstand the kind of worst-case scenario that senator gregg discussed? >> the answer is no. we should have learned that from 2008 when these dominos start to topple. it hits everybody. and this is what is so inexplicable. why did the germans draw the line on this, for sheer domestic political reasons. they don't want to be bailing out russian oil gargs. they have an election this year. they have k
%, which meant it was getting broad support from all sectors of the economy. i did make a mistake, which was turning it over to iraqi politicians. i should have turned it over to judges, people who did not have a political ax to grind. on the army, there was no question it was the right thing to do not to recall the army. we should have not said it was disbanding it. the pentagon said it would be self-demobilized. it would have been a big mistake to have called the army back. it would have led to the break up iraq. the kurds were very clear they would secede. when we did try to bring back a single battalion in april 2004, it went immediately over to the insurgency and started shooting at americans. it did not work. building the army from the bottom up -- a new army from the bottom up -- was the right path. today, the iraqi army is the most respected institution in the country. >> when you look back your tenure in baghdad, it was a difficult time. are you proud of what you did? >> i am satisfied. proud is probably going to far. i think that the 3000 civilians who work in the cpa from 25 d
brands think of the economy and the american consumer? susie sits down with the top man at coca-cola. all that and more coming up right now on "nbr." good evening and welcome to our public television viewers. susie, once again, little cyprus making big economic noise today. >> you're right, tyler. actually a big win for citizens in cyprus. lawmakers rejected today an unpopular and unprecedented proposal to tax bank deposits. it was part of a larger eurozone bailout plan to rescue those banks and keep the nation solvent. the crucial vote came after a wave of protests, and as cypr t cypriots scrambled to withdraw cash from their atms. bertha coombs joins us with more on today's historic vote and what's ahead for cyprus? >> what's ahead is a very big question. the world was watching the tiny island nation again today, in a show of hands-on opposition, party members voted no on a tax and 10% of bank deposits, a condition set by eurozone officials to secure 10 billion euro bailout. many called it extortion. ruling party members abstained saying beyond saying no they need to find another plan.
affect the u.s. economy. presumably including cyprus. as well as the improving u.s. job market, and strong housing sector. and as we wait for fed officials to wrap up their meeting tomorrow, it's expected they will leave interest rates unchanged. joining us to talk more about the fed, randall krosner, former fed governor and now professor of economics at the university of chicago. i've not had the benefit of being in those meetings. you have, and i'm curious to know, do you think cyprus came up? if so, how? and how would the fed governors and members of the fomc handicap its possible effects on the u.s. economy? >> it certainly would have come up, i think, if some analogies with iceland from a number of years ago. even a smaller country, only 250,000 people, not a million people, but it was something that we focused on. we worried about and tried to think of what the implications are. here it's clear the europeans have made i think a terrible mistake in making this proposal. that potentially could undermine confidence, and that could have knock-on effects not only for the whole
have promised to tackle corruption and keep the economy growing. in his first speech as head of state, xi jinping also spoke of overseeing a chinese renaissance. politicians in pakistan are hoping to reach agreement for an interim government to oversee elections. the prime minister has addressed the nation after his government became the first in the nation's history to serve a full five-year term. more radioactive waste is leaking from the most contaminated nuclear site in the united states. another 2000 liters of waste have recently spilled. over 4 million liters since the 1940's. we have this report from washington state. >> this is the edge of the hanford nuclear station in washington state, a 1500 square kilometers site, with the dubious distinction of being the most contaminated place in america. recently, the government disclosed that six large underground tanks are leaking up radioactive of waste each year. it alarms environmentalists, who fear that it could pass into groundwater in a nearby river. >> the tank leaks are shocking, the size and number. the fact that the departme
part of the economy that's being left at a tivitate now, and where's the exit strategy? >> and i think revenue could be an issue. oracle is out with its third quarter. revenue came at 8.6 billion versus 9.3 billion, an estimate. jon fortt has all the numbers right now. >> let's drill down to some numbers, maria. exactly where oracle missed, because this is a miss. on new license and cloud revenue, the street was looking for 2.57 billion. they came in at $2.3. on hardware product revenue, the street wanted somewhere around $800 million in research. they came in at $671 million. that's well below their guided range on that. and on non-gap operating margin, they came in at 47%, which is right about where the street was looking. they don't give guidance until the call, but this is really important, because they're guiding into their biggest quarter, their fiscal q4. also, larry ellison has said the hardware business was going to have a transition quarter in q3. we should expect to start seeing it growing in q4, given this hardware number, it's going to be especially important for them to b
to give the state all of our resources which would be at least 3 billion euros to help the economy. maybe a little bit of help from heaven. back over to you. >> the archbishop, this is something people should go look up this piece of the story. this is a fascinating piece. he's seen as this spiritual leader there who has been quite vocal. he's been out there talking saying let's get out of the euro and go back to the pound. do we have carolyn? can i briefly ask what it's like on the ground there? we understand that it may be several more days, not just thursday, before people can access their money in cyprus. >> absolutely. initially we know that banks were going to be closed up until tomorrow but at this point there's a lot of speculation that banks will be closed up until tuesday because monday is another bank holiday and at this point it's very, very uncertain that we'll get a viable plan b to get the bailout deal in place at this point it doesn't look like we'll get it by tomorrow. at this point we are expecting that banks are going to be closed for a little bit longer. of course that
schoolers? the right answer later in the grapevine. up next, the state of the u.s. economy. what are the chances of another recession here? for over 75 years people have saved money with...ohhh... ...with geico... ohhh...sorry! director's voice: here we go. from the top. and action for over 75 years people have saved money with gecko so.... director's voice: cut it! ...what...what did i say? gecko? i said gecko? aw... for over 75 year...(laughs. but still trying to keep it contained) director's voice: keep it together. i'm good. i'm good. for over 75...(uncontrollable laughter). what are you doing there? stop making me laugh. vo: geico. saving people money for over seventy-five years. gecko: don't look at me. don't look at me. by the armful? by the barrelful? e carful? how about...by the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> bret: no major changes on the horizon in how the federal reserve is dealing with the economy. while fed chief bernanke says things are getting better not eve
to share with you some views of the economy from our 54 respo respondents. firming housing prices are a game changer. there is something much more self-feeding about recovery this year. could be a turning point. the objepposite from john rober. we believe a recession/economic slowdown is a possibility in the latter half of 2014 or early in 2015. some of the excesses that could cause a recession are beginning to build in the economy. another piece of data, the biggest problems facing our economy, taxes/regulation, 29%. i would say that's a victory given that europe is not in there for fear of recession is not in there. too much deficit reduction, 16%. slow job growth, 12%. too little deficit reduction, 10%. guys, these are more normal problems, i would say, than we've had in the past. the european financial crisis, u.s. financial crisis. sue, i would take a victory, yes, there are problems out there. >> i totally agree with you. it's the first time in a long time we haven't seen europe on a list like that. >> thank you, steve. >> absolutely. thanks, steve. >> sure. >> the markets h
. the economist is out with a report on our economy's saying that our economy is in better shape than you think. we're back with that in a moment. first, i want to give a shout out to my grandmother mabel. she convinced her nursing home to switch cable providers just to see the cycle every day. go, mabel! [ jackie ] it's just so frustrating... ♪ the middle of this special moment and i need to run off to the bathroom. ♪ i'm fed up with always having to put my bladder's needs ahead of my daughter. ♪ so today, i'm finally talking to my doctor about overactive bladder symptoms. [ female announcer ] know that gotta go feeling? ask your doctor about prescription toviaz. one toviaz pill a day significantly reduces sudden urges and accidents, for 24 hours. if you have certain stomach problems or glaucoma, or can not empty your bladder, you should not take toviaz. get emergency medical help right away if your face, lips, throat or tongue swells. toviaz can cause blurred vision, dizziness, drowsiness and decreased sweating. do not drive, operate machinery or do unsafe tasks until you know how tovia
idea. i mean, if you look at cyprus' economy, there are two major factors to that economy. tourism and financial services. you could kill the financial services immediately right there. so it's two underpinnings. almost like when greece was doing smo of the same things. >> but you say it matters because it could spread elsewhere? >> just the thought that somebody thought this was a good idea is scary enough to me, i would think. but it's going to be one of those things. we'll have to watch and see how it folds out. but i've got a feeling it will have to turn itself around fairly quickly. >> michael, what do you think? have you changed any of your behavior in terms of allocating capital, as a result of what we've seen in the last 48 hours? >> no, not really, maria. i still think that cyprus is certainly something to watch. but i think it's just part of the negotiation process, exactly what's happening in greece. we have to watch and see if it accelerates and this idea sweeps around europe, but i doubt that's going to happen. i actually think that europe is starting to present some o
by foreign media organizations. i think there are two main concerns. first, whether the chinese economy will continue to grow sustainably. and secondly, whether a stronger china will become more assertive, and even -- [inaudible] [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] >> translator: i think these two concerns are really necessary. china is capable of achieving sustainable and a healthy economic development, in pursuing social progress. and that are more than 1.3 billion people in this country so we are on a long journey towards modernization. for that we would require an international environment of lasting peace. even if china becomes stronger, we will not seek edge me. because we have learned from our own experience in the modern period that one should not impose on others what he himself does not desire. this is an article of faith for us. [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] >> translator: let me underscore here that china has an unwavering commitment to peaceful development. we also have an unshakable determination to safeguard our country's sovereignty and terri
. connell: highest level close to five years. the economy may be improving. the problem for president obama is his approval rating is not. 47% of americans approving. doug shaw is here to answer that. a record-breaking run last week. you have home production neared the unemployment rate falling. >> first of all, we have dysfunction in washington. we do not have a budget deal. economic growth was tested in the fourth quarter. there is no sign that it is reviving. there really is no revival on main street. connell: is there something politically bad be done? is there something they are not doing right? shouldn't they be better able to take advantage of the perfect stock market and little bit better economic numbers? i think the president is trying to do that now, connell. reaching out to the public senators and paul ryan. we made a deal on the but with newt gingrich. the same thing needs to be done now. dagen: something really struck me. i do not mean to harp on it. the average american wakes up in the morning, you tell me how he feels or she feels that deficit with the daily impact. you kind
, it has taken us 40 years to build our economy to the level it is. with done one day -- within one day, we have shot it down. we are very betrayed. >> they can do it anywhere. live in europe, europe has betrayed us. >> at one stage, the crowd was urged to march towards the presidential palace. many people believed their savings had been guaranteed. what is clear is that the bailout deal negotiated in brussels cannot be implemented here except in the face of furious opposition. will have depositors to pay -- just reducing the amounts savers and depositors will have to pay probably won't be enough. teeple are still trying to get their money out of cash machines, but there are limits on how much they can withdraw. a parliamentary vote on the bailout has been postponed yet again. the government feared it might not win a majority for the bailout. without extra funding, cyprus faces bankruptcy. the british community around -- the british community, around 60,000, is also assessing its losses. cypriot friends are in shock. >> they felt as though someone had put their hand in their pocket and take
and the new fed forecast for the economy. and the stocks we're focused on this morning, blackberry getting an upgrade at morgan stanley and a note titled why it won't go down and it gets into the best buy bull camp, and calling it the best near-term idea in the sector. let's get straight to fedex. the package delivery company says it earned $1.23 a share in the fiscal third quarter and below wall street forecasts. fedex says the customers were choosing slower transit services. this does happen, of course, after a massive run in the transports. >> one of the things that amazes me about fedex is they keep missing and they get loved a few days later. missed and gets loved. it's still regarded as being a profit machine. they have this restructuring that people like very much. people feel it's only a matter of time before someone steps up to the more expensive freight. to me, my charitable trust owns ups. ups has the expectations lower. scott davis always says negative things. >> melissa hit the nail on the head. the stock had a big run and the two guys were going head to head over what was in
's face it. cyprus is a small economy. the smallest thread can unravel the entire tapestry of the euro zone. the size of cyprus is not the point here. the point is the principle, precedent and risk of contagion spiralling out of control. >> that's how we see it here. thank you, charles dallara. now it's time to ask the money question. will cyprus and the eu woes kill our economic optimism? we'll debate that next up. the real loser could be crooked russian billionaires whose money-laundering operations in cyprus run the country. that's why vladimir putin is so angry about this bank tax. feel like capitalism may be the best bet to prosperity, but there is not one ounce of free market capitalism in this cyprus story. i'm larry kudlow. we'll be right back. [ female announcer ] what if the next big thing, isn't a thing at all? it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it ge
times the size of its economy without having some kind of bail structure in a solution, it becomes very difficult. and i think that understanding is quite clear among investors. so from a longer term perspective, i think there's a positive element here which is a more substantial bailin in this solution. >> valentin, what kind of exposure do you have in europe at this point and what changes have you made in regard to how the cypriot levy is handled? >> it is creating a bit of uncertainty. clearly, it comes from lingering uncertainty over the political situation in italy. so all in all, it makes the bit more cautious on europe. not so much on our overall willingness to take risks. we're still overweight global real estate, but we have still put down our exposure in europe, so we are now under weight european equities. we are cautious on peripheral bull markets and european fixed income space. so that is the main changes. still on the regional allocation that we have, but not so much altering our overall willingness to look for risk. i think in general, the broadening of the global cycle
here. you've got the good economy. tremendous housing numbers, miraculous retail sales, terrific oil and gas markets. you have the bad economy. weakening commodity prices. slow commercial real estate business. really bad world commerce outlook. real soft information technology sales. you mix them all up together and you get the absolute perfect environment for the fed reserve to stay stock market friendly. that's what happened today. ben bernanke allowed the averages to power higher. the s&p rising today, nasdaq jumping 7.8%. it's not sleight of hand or alchemy at work here, despite what critics say when they constantly slam the fed. >> boo! >> bernanke is not playing a game of move the stock market higher by simply continuing to keep the competition in bonds incredibly weak. he's got a real good reason for doing what he's doing which is staying the course, keeping rates low. that reason? 1937. see, ben bernanke is a rigorous guy. he's a professor. and a genuine scholar of american financial history. it's what he does best. he knows that 1937 after three years of 12% economic growth
a little bit. >> that's a good point. for a long time the bears have been insisting that the global economy is not as healthy as this teflon stock market in the united states would indicate, and now they've got some ammunition. two companies from fed ex and from caterpillar. now, caterpillar had dismal three-month sales numbers. really shocked a lot of people. fed ex, of course, had disappointing earnings situation, lower than expected international volume. now people are saying, see, we told you. here are who big companies who are saying it's not as big as everybody said. deere got a downgrade from wells fargo. i'll talk more about that in the 2:00. a little bit of good news on housing. keeps rolling along. lenore, 34% increase in building. >> we'll see you back in a few minutes. ty, we'll send it back up to you. >> thank you very much. bob just gave you a very clear shot at the market picture, so what's driving it? well, obviously three developing stories and we're going to cue you in on all of them right now. the fed, steve liesman is in washington. russia's financial overtures toward cy
than three hours from the federal reserve notes and whether or not it continues stimulating the economy at the current levels, keeps propping things up. why don't you just pick up from where we left off because talking about washington related to the bigger picture scenario not assist early today but the role the federal reserve plays in all of this as long as interest rates stay as low as they are, what do you think? >> the fed plays a big role keeping interest rates low. i heard on the fiscal side, you're right, maybe outside of the beltway the washington fatigue, but returned to the fed, everyday to indicate the fed keeps the pedal to the metal, 85 billion per month, there'll be some talk about scaling it back later this year. the thing to watch is the fed forecast. all the members put in the economic forecast for the next three years. my guess is it'll be a little bit more promising for social and employment rate above 6.5% until 2015 and that is the threshold, they will not move interest rates up before your employment rate gets to that level, that is still at least two years from
insolvent. the banks in cyprus are huge, eight times the size of the economy. consider that here in the united states. our banking system is roughly one-time the size of our economy. what we're waiting to see next are they going to get this through parliament and get it done? it is so controversial they're trying to find out different ways to make it less controversial. impose the tax on larger shareholders to a much greater degree. it was originally 9.9% and you go to 12%. if you didn't want to tax the small guys at all you'd have to go to 15% or 16%. this is the scene when the president walked into the palace headquarters. there were people there with no written on their hand and this says merkel stole our money. keep in mind, european union will still give them 10 billion euros and they were trying to come up to reduce the original size from 17 billion euros. the other thing to keep in mind, by taxing depositors they're taxing a lot of foreigners and a lot of russians who had kept their money. the thing is will the rest of europe, will small depositors across the rest of europ
home building numbers today too. >> that too. we're in a niche market. the u.s. has had their economy outperform other economies and i think it's a flight to safety relative to the u.s. markets on one hand and it's an unwind from the bond market and risk exposure going forward to rate changes on the other hand. so it's both a flight to safety as well as, you know, what's really going on domestically and people are looking at a twist now with the fed and what their posture will be heading forward. >> i'll be back, adobe earnings at the top of the hour. >> take care, maria. >> what do you think? we're finishing positive here. this market doesn't want to go up? you think some of that's short covering? >> i think that's what we're see right now. finishing up the day. right now people will have to play it cautiously. we haven't seen the end of the cyprus thing. we have some negotiating going on from russia. the impact of that, as you mentioned, is a little minor relative to the size and scope of them, but it's whether or not that moves into italy, spain, as we've all been talking about. >>
the day. from the economy to earnings now. we get a number of interesting quarterly reports due today as well. before the bell, we'll hear from fedex, general mills and lennar and this afternoon we have oracle. a lot to chew on for the markets. s&p by the way coming off its first three-day decline of 2013. take a look at u.s. equity futures at this hour. green arrows across the board. and then of course there's cyprus. the country's leaders are holding crisis talks today trying it avert a financial meltdown. the parliament rejected an unprecedented tax on bank deposits. that was a key part of the eu bailout terms. the finance minister is in moscow today with mounting speculation that russia could step in with a safety plan to safeguard russian deposits in cyprus. steve sedgwick is in moscow where he caught up with the finance minister there an hour or so ago. steve? >> they turned to russians once again. there's a loan on the table from russians dating back from 2011 so it's not the exception to it the rule for the cypriots to turn to the russians. the russians themselves are indignan
and the austerity he is putting in place has caused the economy to be really slow. >> a lot of tax increases over there in europe. we look at this austerity bit. i want to talk about this for a second. >> i want to get back to the budget then. >> talk about what is happening in washington. you know, economics discussed on tv or on the internet or on twitter, it's so depressing, because people really don't know what they are talking about and they just sort of boil it down and there is this belief through the years, that tax cuts are not a tool used. of course, tax cuts are a tool used and tax increases something that traditional are against in bad times. we hear about austerity across great britain and we never hear about the tax increases. when you talk about the fact they cut and slash spending at the same time they hike taxes, it really was a formula made to fail. >> spending cuts and tax increases both take money out of the economy and slow the economy and, yes, they create this idea of austerity. but, look. it's a balancing problem. on the one hand you need to deal with it budgets and defici
setback for chancellor angela merkel, just when she needed a victory with hard-hit eurozone economies contracting and german taxpayers nervous of the cost of bailouts. opposition parties are demanding the chancellor improve her track record. >> the fiscal cliffhanger in cyprus has turned into a major headache for angela merkel in her role as crisis manager. for many on the island, germany as part of the problem, but she points out that the troika is the negotiating partner for any bailout, not germany. >> politically, it is important that cyprus create a sustainable banking sector for the future. their current model is not sustainable. >> merkel also stressed that the eu had requested a levy on private accounts above 100,000 euros and not the 20,000 suggested by cyprus' government, but the german government says the cyprus debacle is covered in angela merkel's fingerprints and she must find a solution. >> the chancellor must make sure that the deal is struck which represents the interests of cyprus and stabilizes the european economic zone. >> but according to mrs. merkel, the ball is
is normal banking business. there is enough money to keep the economy moving forward, but these are very, very difficult days. tomorrow, the banks will be closed again, and quite possibly on friday, too. >> thank you. we are bringing you all of the latest developments from cyprus as they search for a solution there. police have searched the home of kristie in the guard. ofkhristine lasard, the head the international monetary fund. the operator of japan pose the damaged nuclear power plant in fukushima said iraq had been responsible for a loss of power this week. -- said a rat has been responsible for a loss of power this week. a dead rat was found near a switchboard. the company is investigating whether the raft was the cause. that it has killed a french national captured in mali in 2011. it claims it executed the man in retaliation for france's intervention in mali. the french foreign ministry said it is trying to verify those claims. the first test- tube baby was born in the u.k., the country could be leading the way again. this time it is a new idf procedure that creates a baby with t
to the forefront and that's more important. the u.s. economy, china and although there is a big idea they're stealing customer's money and savings accounts is abomination, i believe it's a different european country. entered the european union in 2008, i don't think it will be as big of a deal as people think, i think it will be on the headlines for two weeks. stuart: all right, let's see what's happening on the opening bell, upside. and i'm looking for a gain of 20, 30 points for the time they're open, 10 points higher, 14,462. nicole, let's bring you in. one of your favorite stocks, we're watching it closely. yoga pants, they say they're too sheer. in other words, you can see through them. i think that the stock is way down. nicole: it is way down. it's going to hurt their bottom line. and they're talking about bringing in the pants that are sheer. that basically is like a fall for the company, you can't have pants that are sheer. i have to admit my lululemon, i noticed recently is sheer and it's no joke and you're able to bring them back in, but it's going to hurt their revenue and bot
.2948. >> some positive news for the european economy today. airbus has just signed the biggest civil aviation deal in history. it is with ryanair. >> it will provide a much-needed boost to the economy promising to secure 5000 jobs in france alone over the coming decade. >> the signatures are worth a lot of money. airbus will likely discount package of 234 plans, they have a list price of 18 billion euro. assembly will take part in france with parts from several european locations. it will be at capacity for four years. >> of bills meanwhile pride that we epitomize european success. we are working together to create jobs. >> the deal means more than money and well paying jobs. ryanair is a new customer for airbus. they have previously purchased all their planes from their arrival, boeing. >> the western-backed opposition is meeting in istanbul to p ick the new prime minister. the first tasks is creating a cabinet. >> the conflict is expected to escalate further with britain and france say they plan on our main local groups. especially when it comes to political and military priorities, they do
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